My dropbox is not updating

At a press event in San Francisco this morning, Houston announced that the company has now topped

At a press event in San Francisco this morning, Houston announced that the company has now topped $1 billion in recurring annual revenue; he claims it’s the fastest software-as-a-service firm to climb to that milestone as quickly.But Dropbox’s master plan has remained opaque until now.Dropbox’s developers and designers asked: What if you ditched the whole office suite and started from scratch? Dropbox’s office, by contrast, is flashily designed and full of post-corporate sass.At first blush, Dropbox’s answer to this seems underwhelming. Nobody gets a private office, but you can work on the garden roof, or in the ground-floor coffeehouse that roasts its own beans, or in either of two alternative quiet rooms — one a bright, wood-accented library, and the other (“Deep Focus”) a futuristic black womb.Dropbox became a darling company of the cloud computing startup wave by keeping users’ files in sync.Elegant, efficient, and reliable, its software now holds 500 million users’ digital lives together across time, space, and every platform and device. For files, the question is easy to answer: When something changes over here, you want those changes to be reflected everywhere, speedily and invisibly.A year ago, it shut down a photo sharing project called Carousel and an email app it had acquired called Mailbox.

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At a press event in San Francisco this morning, Houston announced that the company has now topped $1 billion in recurring annual revenue; he claims it’s the fastest software-as-a-service firm to climb to that milestone as quickly.

But Dropbox’s master plan has remained opaque until now.

Dropbox’s developers and designers asked: What if you ditched the whole office suite and started from scratch? Dropbox’s office, by contrast, is flashily designed and full of post-corporate sass.

At first blush, Dropbox’s answer to this seems underwhelming. Nobody gets a private office, but you can work on the garden roof, or in the ground-floor coffeehouse that roasts its own beans, or in either of two alternative quiet rooms — one a bright, wood-accented library, and the other (“Deep Focus”) a futuristic black womb.

Dropbox became a darling company of the cloud computing startup wave by keeping users’ files in sync.

Elegant, efficient, and reliable, its software now holds 500 million users’ digital lives together across time, space, and every platform and device. For files, the question is easy to answer: When something changes over here, you want those changes to be reflected everywhere, speedily and invisibly.

A year ago, it shut down a photo sharing project called Carousel and an email app it had acquired called Mailbox.

billion in recurring annual revenue; he claims it’s the fastest software-as-a-service firm to climb to that milestone as quickly.But Dropbox’s master plan has remained opaque until now.Dropbox’s developers and designers asked: What if you ditched the whole office suite and started from scratch? Dropbox’s office, by contrast, is flashily designed and full of post-corporate sass.At first blush, Dropbox’s answer to this seems underwhelming. Nobody gets a private office, but you can work on the garden roof, or in the ground-floor coffeehouse that roasts its own beans, or in either of two alternative quiet rooms — one a bright, wood-accented library, and the other (“Deep Focus”) a futuristic black womb.Dropbox became a darling company of the cloud computing startup wave by keeping users’ files in sync.Elegant, efficient, and reliable, its software now holds 500 million users’ digital lives together across time, space, and every platform and device. For files, the question is easy to answer: When something changes over here, you want those changes to be reflected everywhere, speedily and invisibly.A year ago, it shut down a photo sharing project called Carousel and an email app it had acquired called Mailbox.

But Dropbox has also had some recent rough patches.

This didn’t always make security-minded IT managers happy, but over time Dropbox negotiated a truce with them and starting selling business accounts.

Today Dropbox says it’s being used in 8 million businesses, and more than 200,000 of those pay for the service, getting administrative controls, more space, and, now, collaboration tools.

Houston and his co-founder, Arash Ferdowsi, set out to render thumb drives obsolete and make cloud storage work for everyday people.

But as engineers and other early adopters embraced Dropbox, they started smuggling it into the workplace.

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That was about the same time the new headquarters opened and employees found, nestled at the heart of the labyrinth, a costly five-foot-tall chrome statue of a panda (the company mascot).

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